Honor Thy Father and Mother, Part 2

posted by Dr. Jael Ever @ 7:00 AM
June 28, 2019

Remember when The LORD wrote: “Honor Thy Father and Mother”  He did not say this honor was to be based the merits of one’s parents.

So . . . let me see: How shall I honor my mother? Well, in one way or another she lived with me for over half of my life. Eventually, she was very supportive of me, and she was a wonderful loving grandmother to my three children.

After my father died–in those near-depression and extremely segregated times–although she was a beautiful mulatto woman with dark brown straight hair, she still had to do manual labor six or seven days a week.

But here the beauty which had captivated my father was a great disadvantage. The hiring white and Jewish housewives did not want such a good looking woman around their husbands. In addition, my mother had very little experience with housework, or cooking or maid dining service. Thus, she was fired many times.

Again, I didn’t live with her very often Either staying with Mother Dear, or with her mother, Grandma Bumbry–who weighed over 300 pounds and didn’t like me very much–when we moved to Pittsburg. A few years later, when we moved this time to Washington, D.C., she boarded me with one of my fellow class-mates for which she paid their parents $ 11.00 a week for the room I shared with a daughter, and meals of one and half times a day.

So I was actually raised in a quasi-orhant state. I only saw my mother on some Sundays when she would pick me up for a ride on the bus to go to what would best be described as “intellectually quasi-Christian services–such as “Daily Word” or “Christian Science.”

Often we just sat in Christian Science reading rooms where I would read the Bible along with Mary Baker Eddy’s Book, “Science and Health with Keys to the Scriptures,” while mother read pamphlets on spiritual power.

She seldom took me to where she lived. Once when she did, this sleazy tall light brown-skinned man named Mr. Tabron tried to rape me with one of his hands over my mouth while mom was gone to the store. He was stopped when the elderly lady who actually rented the apartment and let mom have a bedroom and kitchen use screamed for him to stop.

When I was 15, four African-American teachers who believed in me began tutoring me for college. Two of them trained me in public speaking and entered me in the Negro Elks Oratorical Contests which I won on local, state and national levels, and for which I won a four year scholarship to college.

Thus, at 15 years of age, with one poka-dot skirt, two blouses and a pea-green jacket–and with no sanitary napkins–I went off to Howard University in Washington, D. C. After that, even the $ 11.00 a week stopped.

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